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Our Oxfordshire architects develop a farm site to create holiday and leisure facilities

26 Feb '20

Oxfordshire architects farm site
Architectural Art Board

Last year our Oxfordshire architects shared a planned Cotswold barn conversion after approval was gained. The clients approached our team hoping to turn a large agricultural building into a substantial property to be used as a holiday let. The planners were impressed by our considerate design and building began on-site in the autumn. Our architects have now been invited back to look at further developments, helping to expand the holiday and leisure facilities.

 

Whilst the designs are as yet to pass through planning, we have on the drawing board this latest impressive holiday let, making use of the landowner’s disused outbuildings. Having already gained planning for the initial large-scale development, before we put this project to the planners it is vital that we assess the site to minimise the potential impact of further building, in terms of the visual presence. We are ensuring large landscaped areas are designed with high wildflower meadows to break up the hard structures, screen the site from the public realm and push improved biodiversity.

 

Externally, any further structures will appear minimalistic and uniform in appearance, with smaller slit windows to help improve privacy within the development. Initially, using one of the outbuildings as a spa was discussed, with dark lines and selective lighting to evoke the senses, however, the clients are now considering replacing the leisure barn with a third holiday let.

 

Internally, the layout of the scheme works with the orientation of the bedrooms, positioned to the north and western sides to allow prominent views. Our current design is single storey, with three bedrooms, each with an ensuite bathroom. There may be scope to allow a mezzanine space, however, detailed surveys would be required to gauge how this space may be best used. Emphasis will be placed on the open plan living area and we feel it is important to think outside the box, providing guests with surprise and intrigue using features they may not be familiar with, such as glazed corners, louvered cladding concealing glass behind or large scale natural focal points. Whilst a two-storey option has been discussed on a similar footprint to the single storey, it is felt it may not pass planning, given the size of the Dutch barn already on site.

 

We will, of course, keep you up-to-date with the further development on-site and look forward to sharing planning news in the future.

 

Do you have outbuildings that you would like to make better use of? Why not contact our Oxfordshire architects to discuss?